October 28, 2011

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In the Archive: Yellow Fever and the Hemisphere

The Our Americas Archive Partnership contains a series of documents and educational modules about the history of yellow fever. Medical records and correspondence from doctors and nurses provide a helpful way to study and teach 19th-century histories of healthcare and disease, using yellow fever as a case study. Known as yellow jack, saffron scourge, urban [...]

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October 18, 2011

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Teaching Literature through the Archive

The OAAP has recently published modules highlighting the practice of close-reading skills. (Not sure what a module is? Check out the post “Pedagogical Tools in the OAAP: What is a Module?”) The new educational course Literary Skills and the Archive, suggests ways to introduce thematic questions and closely analyze literary and historical texts. These modules [...]

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October 13, 2011

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In the Archive: Immigrant Texts and the U.S.-Mexican War

“I LEFT home for the United States in the summer of 1845, for the same reason that yearly sends so many thousands there, want of employment,” writes Scottish immigrant and English soldier George Ballentine. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the U.S. received into its midst waves of immigrants from across the globe. Immigrant experiences [...]

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September 27, 2011

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In the Archive: Bills of Slave Sale

  The Our Americas Archive Partnership holds bills of slave sale from the first half of the nineteenth century. While only small pieces of paper, these bills of sale illustrate the historical and economic realities behind the institution of slavery. The history of slavery reflects local, regional, national, hemispheric, and global histories of movement and [...]

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September 19, 2011

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Note to Scholars of the Americas: Postdoctoral Fellowship Opportunity

For those of you interested in postdoctoral fellowships that focus on researching the Americas, check out the Kislak Fellowship in American Studies from the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. Specifically, this fellowship offers opportunities to scholars studying the discovery, contact, and colonial periods in Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica. It supports [...]

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September 6, 2011

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What is Hemispheric Studies?

What is Hemispheric Studies? Hemispheric Studies seeks to consider the Americas as a broad system of exchange, movement, and influence. This field of study considers national and extra-national histories in dialogue with each other, seeking to understand both the borders of nation and the way culture, history, and literature go beyond these borders.  Adopting a [...]

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August 26, 2011

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In the archive: An Ode to Santa Anna’s Leg

  Known (and despised) for his leadership of Mexican troops during the Texas Revolution, Antonio López de Santa Anna, rose and fell as a Mexican national figure. Santa Anna built his career on the multiple foreign aggressions that threatened Mexico, including the Spanish, the French, and the United States. The loss of his leg in [...]

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August 16, 2011

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In the archive: The Great Pyramid of Cholula

  Among the images in the OAAP is a photograph of the Great Pyramid of Cholula (above) from the Charlotte and Maximilian collection, 1846-1927. This photograph shows a church (Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios) atop what appears to be a grassy hill. Yet, this hill is actually the Great Pyramid of Cholula, a [...]

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August 11, 2011

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New educational material on “Hispanic Culture”

Thanks to the great feedback we received from AP Spanish teachers during the AP Summer Institute, we’ve added a new collection of educational material called “Hispanic Culture for the Spanish Classroom.” It’s still under construction, but will include cultural-themed material aimed at the introductory Spanish language classroom (high school and college), such as lesson plans [...]

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August 10, 2011

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In the Archive: Catholic Missions and Spanish Colonialism

Catholic missions, also called doctrinas, reducciónes, and missions, were important religious and political institutions for the Spanish colonization of the Americas. The purpose of a mission was to indoctrinate the natives in the official religion of Spain, and organize natives within the new colonial order (Jackson 23). As the ‘Our Americas’ Archive Partnership (OAAP) educational [...]

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